Easy tips for: Safe sleeping for infants

Date:
1 Jun 2022
Categories:
Tags:

There is nothing more stressful than lying awake at night, wondering if your little bundle of joy is safe in its new environment! Here’s some tips on safe sleeping for infants:

Share your room with baby, not your bed

“Babies should sleep in their parent’s room for the first 6 months, or better yet, until their first birthday. New statistics say room-sharing can lower the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) by as much as 50%. “– says The American Academy of Paediatrics.

Other reasons you should not share your bed with your baby is that it increases the risk of your child’s breathing that could get cut off.

Therefore, a separate sleeping area that attaches to your bed is necessary for your baby. This could be anything from a co-sleeper, crib to a bassinet. Make sure these items are well ventilated and have breathable mattresses.

Less is more with bedding

Your co-sleeper or crib should only have your baby inside of it.

Remove any cute toys, cot bumpers, cot braids, pillows, or blankets. Regarding your mattress, make sure it is firm with a tight fitted sheet.

Same environment for sleep

If your baby is ready to take a nap or sleep, make sure you place them in their co-sleeper or crib for them to associate that space as their sleeping environment.

Try and avoid putting them in an activity toy such as a bouncer, rocker, swing or even the couch for sleep time.

Sleeping position is priority

When placing baby inside of their safe sleeping space, make sure you place them on their back.

Infants are less likely to choke if they are on their back and will be able to cough out or swallow anything they spit up.

Bedtime clothes

Now that you know where and when to place baby for sleep time, what about baby? What should they wear?

For sleep time, it is best that they wear a one-piece sleeper. Don’t use a swaddle blanket to put them to bed.

Find out more on safe sleeping for infants here:

Keep Baby Safe From SIDS and Other Sleep Risks (webmd.com)

menuchevron-down